The Secret to Color Correcting!

Have you wanted to test out color correcting, but don’t even know where to start? This blog post is for you! I’ve always had the darkest circles under my eyes and nothing covers them, even the thickest of concealers. Like everyone I get bright red zits though I didn’t know what colors covered which problems, so I researched and here’s what I’ve found!

LAVENDER – sallowness. Cancels out yellow tones (possibly when you’re sick).

GREEN – neutralizes redness, breakouts, sunburns, and rosacea.

PINK – dark circles on fair toned skin. Works to lift the skin and reduce the appearance of sun spots.

YELLOW – dark circles & dullness. Eliminates purple-hued dark circles and works to brighten your skin tone.

PEACH – dark circles & spots. Neutralizes blue-hues in medium-dark skin tones. Covers hyper-pigmentation and helps to brighten fair skin.

ORANGE – Perfect for blue-hued dark circles or bruises, especially in medium-dark skin tones.

RED – reduces green appearance. Great for dark stubborn circles, hollow eyes, and even tattoos!

I purchased the NYX Color Correcting palette from Ulta to test it out and I LOVE IT! I use it all the time now. When I was first applying the green I was terrified because I thought there was no way you weren’t going to see the hulk disaster through, but you couldn’t tell at all! I applied primer, then color correcting, then foundation, and finally concealer! I was amazed to say the least. They blend out really well (I use a concealer brush to apply).

 

Xx, Kennah

Dying Hair at Home

Being a girl can get pretty expensive with all the beauty treatments and services we pay for each month. I’ve found a way to check one of these off the list and save you some money! This is for girls who dye their hair all one color like me! (Something like balayage or highlights or a drastic color change I would suggest going to a professional for). I’ve divided it into sections to help you understand the whole process!

WHAT YOU’LL NEED:

  1. Hair Dye
  2. Mixing Bowl
  3. Coloring Brush
  4. Gloves

Optional:

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DYE:

First you have to select your color. DO NOT BUY DRUGSTORE HAIR DYE! I buy professional grade hair products and use them at home. If you do not have a cosmetology license or a friend with one who is willing to help you out there are websites you can order it from (it is a few dollars more, but worth it for the quality!) Trust me I’ve tried every drugstore hair dye they make and all of them wash out and if you like your hair neutral or cool toned it always pulls red tones. If your hair is longer than your shoulders and pretty thick you’re going to need 2 boxes of hair dye. The dye I use is ISO icolor in the color 3N. This is super dark and most people say it looks like a 2, but it is actually a 3. icolor dye doesn’t pull red tones and it doesn’t look blue. It doesn’t damage my hair too much (obviously all dye does some damage) and makes it look so shiny and healthy.

DEVELOPER:

If you didn’t already know there are different volumes of developer. 10, 20, 30 (they make 40 level developer, but it is VERY damaging to your hair so only let a pro use this on your hair). The number or level on the bottle of developer represents the amount of hydrogen peroxide it contains. The more peroxide, the more your hair follicle will open during the coloring process. 10 volume developer is the one you would want use if you are going darker than your natural color and don’t need to lift the color at all (this is what I use). 20 developer is great for grey coverage and for coloring 1-2 shades from your current level. 30 volume is used for lightening your hair 3+ shades from your natural hair color.

PREP:

Make sure to move anything you don’t want getting dirty or stained (if you have one, use a cape to protect your clothes). Put vaseline on your skin near your hair line and on your ears so you don’t dye your skin. Once you’ve done it a few times you will get better and you won’t have to do this step. Have face wipes on hand in case you spill any. Start by mixing your color in the bowl using your brush. The hair dye box will give you the color to developer ratio that you should mix to create your color. The dye I use is 1 to 1 1/2 so for every 1 oz of color I use 1.5 oz of developer. Get your parting comb, clip, or a shower cap ready if you have one.

HOW TO:

Start from the roots at the top of your head brushing downwards and move in small sections down. I do one side of my head at a time and then finish with the back. This is where the parting comb comes in handy if you have one. I use mine to section off pieces about 1 inch apart. I brush both sides of each strand of hair (top and bottom) with a good glob of hair dye and massage it in a little with my gloves to make sure it’s evenly spread. Then I flip it over to the opposite side and clip it, then continue down. When doing the back of your head it can be tricky, but if you use 2 mirrors across from each other you can see the back of your head and it makes it a ton easier! Once you have it completely covered clip it up and put on the shower cap to make sure you don’t get it on anything while you wait for it to finish (usually 40 minutes ish).

CLEAN UP: 

I hand scrub the bowl and brush and then wash my hands with the gloves still on using regular hand soap. Then I lay them out to dry. Rise the dye out before you start shampooing, I like to lay in the tub with my head under the faucet for this step.

EXTRA TIPS AND INFO:

  • You cannot dye hair while it is wet, it must be dry but it is the best to dye 2nd day hair that has all your natural oils.
  • Use a color therapy shampoo and conditioner afterwards. I use joico brand k-pak color therapy.
  • Use a hair mask to repair the hair (about once a week). I use the joico k-pak one as well.

Xx, Kennah